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erikkwakkel:

Medieval church turned into bookstore

Here is something the book lovers among you will enjoy. In the Dutch city of Zwolle an abandoned local church was turned into a bookstore. Dating from the 15th century, the church was part of the Dominican monastery in the city. It’s a little strange to see big Gothic windows all around when you’re browsing for books (not to mention the giant organ hanging over your head), but it sure makes for a gorgeous setting to get your reading fix, as these images show.

More about the architecture and design in this most interesting article. In Maastricht, in the south of Holland, another Dominican church was turned into a bookstore; see some truly stunning pics here.

Basilica of San Vitale - Ravenna (Italy)

The Church of San Vitale, the masterpiece of Byzantine art in Ravenna. Construction began in 526 by Bishop Ecclesius under the Ostrogothic queen Amalasuntha (d. 535) and was consecrated in 547 during the reign of the emperor Justinian. This octagonal church, built of marble and capped by a lofty terra-cotta dome, is one of the most important surviving examples of Byzantine architecture and mosaic work.

 virtual tour here

(Source: irefiordiligi)

littlelimpstiff14u2:

Wookjae Maeng  ( Korean ) - Ceramics and Slip Casting

The theme of my work is to represent complex, ambiguous and uncomfortable
relationships between man and animal. Nature and animals has been an object of art  for a long time. And, it will be continued until the fall of human being,although the point of view has been changed. There are lots of living creatures on the earth.

The human is on the top of the ecological pyramid now and can manage all kinds of our fellow creatures. However, it is getting worse for certain.

http://wookjae.com/
 


(via hifructosemag)

hifructosemag:

Mark Dean Veca’s new, site-specific installation, “Le Poppy Den,” is currently on view at David B. Smith Gallery in Denver. The artist chose the color red because, in the design world, it is used to drive hunger and consumerism. Read more about the exhibition on Hi-Fructose.

littlelimpstiff14u2:

 The Ghostly Sculptures of Bruno Walpoth

Ghostly sculptures of Bruno Walpoth. Life-size, his powdered beauties, as if in opposition to their ghostly stature, seem heavy and grounded, their gazes locking whomever sees them into a spiritual arrest.

Working with traditional sculptural methods, Walpoth’s work is almost alchemical in quality.  Muscles, eyes and fingers that have been carved into wood (lime and walnut) or covered with lead leaf foils, seem soft and supple, sad and pensive. Idealistically beautiful, his figures show signs of bones and sinew under fragile skin.

Marks from carving tools show on the surface of the wooden bodies, and serve as quiet reminders that these creatures are not human. The marks break what anthropomorphizing has taken place and the observer is introduced to (or reminded of) the artist.  In a strange way, that break makes these works even more fascinating; they make clearly visible the love that has been passed from the creator to the created.

“Contrary to Geppetto, who constructed himself a child (Pinocchio) out of a piece of wood to banish his loneliness, Bruno Walpoth attempts, perhaps out of awareness of life’s transience, to immortalize the volatile spark of youthfulness he catches in the eyes of his models – sometimes his own children – into a wooden sculpture,” writes Absolute Art Gallery‘s Diana Gadaldi.  Walpoth’s figures are also reminiscent of the children in the paintings of Dino Valls and Gottfried Helnwein, yet are not so tortured nor forced into adulthood.  They are more ghostly, or perhaps more Buddhist, as if silently accepting of a new maturity.  Ms. Gadaldi also states that “[they] seem to be immersed in a moment of intimate meditation. Their detached attitude and dreamy expression are characteristic for the stage of life they are going through: one of slow but inexorable physical and psychological development. As they evolve from children to adolescents and from adolescents to young adults, the first traces of self-consciousness and emotional involvement appear on their often still infantile faces.”

http://www.walpoth.com/wood.html

http://www.modernism.ro/2012/02/19/ghostly-sculptures-of-bruno-walpoth/

(via hifructosemag)